Master of the Renaissance – Hernan Cattaneo

Features

For the latest installment to the vaunted Masters Series, Renaissance once again called on Hernan Cattaneo, and he responded by delivering his finest mix compilation to date.  Data Transmission connected with Hernan to dig deeper into his creative process as well as discuss the forecast for his Sudbeat label, B2B gigs with Nick Warren, New Year’s gig plans and also who he believes is worthy of continuing the Renaissance Masters legacy. Renaissance celebrated its twentieth anniversary this year.  How has your partnership with the label evolved over the years, and what are the label’s strengths? I think the best thing about them is that they’ve kept quality as the common denominator in all their releases over such a long period of time- maybe longer than anyone else.  I’ve been working with them for a decade now, and it always felt like it was the right place for the music I like to play and produce. Was this time around much different compared to compiling and arranging your previous Renaissance mixes?  Were there any obstacles?   Not really.  The bigger downside has always been to make the final list when you need to leave many tracks out that you like a lot.  I’ve been very lucky to work with great producers and labels, and they’ve all been very supportive of my compilations over the years. For the first disc of your latest Masters Series compilation, you revisit a technique you first explored on your 2010 Parallel release where you converted club tracks into more chilled pieces by slowing the tempo from the original speed of 125-128 bpm to 103-105 bpm.  Was this a challenging process? I’ve always liked the slower stuff and thought that some club tracks would work perfectly at that tempo. Luckily, these days technology allows you to manipulate things in such a way that you can do almost anything without compromising sound quality like never before.  The only challenge is to fit all those great tracks into 78 minutes without making something that sounds like a mash-up, since that’s not the idea.  It’s very exciting to work with producers when you are allowed to ask them to adjust their tracks to fit your own ideas.