Turning Points: Archie Hamilton

New Talent

archiehamilton2.jpg

Has there been a particular moment or night that’s felt like a milestone in your career?

There have been a few and they seem to be happening more frequently. I think the first moment when I realised this is actually real was quite recently. Last summer I was in the office looking at Music On videos on YouTube, and the first one I picked was called “Marco Carola, Music On opening track”. I thought I had iTunes on in the background, but then I realised it was my track called “Take It Off” on District Raw – the whole terrace was fist-pumping. I was shaking and thought I was going to throw up in my bin. Not that it is particularly what I am into, but seeing it presented on that scale it made me realise that I must be doing something right. From that, the next one was when I’d been out for quite a heavy weekend; I was in the office on Monday morning, not feeling too good. I opened Facebook and there was a message from somebody whose name I didn’t recognise, and it said “I just wanted to say hello, I’ve been playing your music and I really like what you’re doing”. I looked down and it was from tINI. I was amazed that she’d gone out of her way to message me. I kept sending her music and she was really supportive, playing it on her radio show, and in clubs.

You’re playing tINI and the Gang. That must be pretty exciting. 

It is – that and fabric are the most exciting things that have happened so far, I think. I can’t really get over her belief in artists that she finds. She’s incredibly generous and good at supporting young, up-and-coming artists. I’m very thankful.

So it all came about from her Facebook message.

Yeah pretty much – I think Patrice Meiner had passed her some music, so I have him to thank! She came to London once last year and was in the Hoxton Hotel with Guti, and her tour manager Greg. It was when they had table tennis tables, and Greg and I ended up playing for hours. That was the first time we met properly, and about five or six months later there was another Facebook message, this time inviting me out to play in the summer.

You’ve been playing the Rhythmatic nights for a while now. Who have you really enjoyed watching out of the guests?

I think most impressive technically has to be Fumiya Tanaka. It must have been around 4:30 in the morning. There were two tracks in the mix together and one record skipped and they fell out of beat. He didn’t even take the fader down; he just put his hand on the record and then dropped it back in perfectly. The man is a scientist. Doing that, the crowd went absolutely crazy, more so than any breakdowns/buildups. There was a split second where everyone just looked at each other in disbelief. We’ve also had Priku play a couple of times, who I’ve really enjoyed. Maayan Nidam was also great. She’s got this energy about her; this tiny girl just smiling away, playing the most amazing music.

Who would be your dream back-to-back with?

I’ve had a few dream back to backs at Rhythmatic actually! Towards the end of the night, and at the afters we all usually play together with the guests. To be honest, I absolutely love playing with close friends like Dan Farserelli and Stathis Lazarides as we can be ourselves completely.

You mentioned M-nus and the minimal sound. Has that been quite influential on your productions?

At the beginning, certainly. I remember getting the “Decks Efx & 909” CD and I locked myself in my room and listened to it over and over. Looking at the way that he was layering the sounds, bringing elements in and out rather than it being just tracks played back-to-back. I hadn’t really thought about it like that before, it was a bit of a revelation. The trouble is that people jump on the bandwagon and run sounds into the ground. Other interesting things came out, and I moved on to more groovy/tribal house, and I suppose I find myself somewhere in between that minimalism and groove now. 

You’ve been very busy this year with releases. Most recently “Antithesis” with a really good title track on that EP. Have you got much planned for the future?

Yeah, I’ve got lots coming up. There’s a remix for Ittetsu from me and Dan Farserelli on a Japanese label called Fasten Musique, that’s a bit more rolling.

Stathis Lazarides and I also have a release coming on Memoria, with a mind-blowing remix from Alex Celler. Originally it was supposed to be three originals and one remix on the vinyl, but we had to drop one of the originals because Alex’s remix is so good, and being 14 minutes long, it needed its own side. I’ve basically spent the whole of the last year doing collaborations and really enjoyed it, working with Stathis, Dan, Patrice Meiner, Mariano Mateljan and others. For the next year I want to continue working with these guys, and also concentrate on solo material too.

Continued on page 4